Person of the Week

Lou Fusz Jr.

President and CEO of Lou Fusz Automotive Retailing and Servicing

There are many people who sell cars and trucks.  What makes our business different is our people.  We have a desire to provide better service to our customers.  I would tell someone searching for a mission, “Don’t forget your spiritual side.”  It’s something that people sometimes overlook.

1.  What led you to the mission of President and CEO Lou Fusz Automotive Retailing and Servicing?

My father started what is Lou Fusz Pontiac in 1952. (Click here to see the present day dealer website.)  As I grew up, I worked washing cars in the summer.  As I got older, I worked in service and later started selling new and used cars. Each year, during my teenage years and throughout the summers, I worked at the dealership.  After graduating from Georgetown University in 1969,  I decided I wanted to get married and felt an affinity for the business.  I thought it would be something we could grow.  That was my reasoning.

2.  What does this mission mean to you?

Retailing and servicing is what we do, but I really look at it like we are in the people business.  There are many people who sell cars and trucks.  What makes our business different is our people.  We have a desire to provide better service to our customers.  This commitment differentiates us.

3.  What was your best day as President and CEO Lou Fusz Automotive Retailing and Servicing?

The biggest surprise or best day was when I was selected in 1989 as Time Magazine’s quality dealership of the year.  It’s a national honor and they had each state select a candidate.  I was selected as the Time Magazine Quality Dealer of the Year for 1989.

4.  What was your worst day as a President and CEO Lou Fusz Automotive Retailing and Servicing?

There are a lot times that you see something happen that disappoints you.  It is something that your company does not espouse to be or something happens that isn’t within our culture.  Unfortunately things like that happen and you just have to use it as a coaching moment and bring that person back in line.  You hope this won’t happen again.  It’s disappointing when you see some of the things people can do to other people. Hopefully it doesn’t happen very often.

5.  How did you survive your worst day?

I have a strong faith.  Not on just the worst day, but everyday, having a strong faith is part of the way I operate.  I go to church every morning and start the day that way.  I try to treat other people in the way I would like to be treated.  I would tell someone searching for a mission, “Don’t forget your spiritual side.”  It’s something that people sometimes overlook.

We just got back from Haiti.  Living in this country (America), we have some tremendous advantages over any other place in the world.  In America that you can be who you really want to be.

4 Comments

  1. Lou’s reminder to remember our “spiritual side” while working, is a good thing to keep in mind. And to treat others as we want to be treated. How easy it is to neglect this part within ourselves during our work day. I am grateful to Lou, for the fine example he is setting!

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  2. Barbara Sheets 03/2/13
    12:55 pm

    It is refreshing to think of a car dealership being steered by spiritual values when sometimes our stereotypical view of car sales is quite the opposite. Thank you for being a force for good in the community.

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  3. Congratulations Lou!

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  4. Lou,
    A friend found out how you steered your company through the economic crises of the past few years. She was so impressed at how you treated your employees and customers. Because of this reputation, she bought a car at your dealership and nominated you for Person of the Week at Umission.org. What a positive impact you are making on the community. How many people you have blessed in your work. The world is a better place because of you. I now understand why — an important factor is your steadfastness not forgetting your “spiritual” side. Thanks for all you do.

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